Story Starter Boot Camp: Settings

Now, I know what you’re thinking.

About food, most likely, or I don’t know, on the off chance you’re thinking about me posting…

Well…

I’m a teenager who takes a lot in, being a drill sergeant isn’t really my niche.

But you know what is?

Running this story starter boot camp!

It’s time to delve deep into the world of settings, and when I say world, I mean more then just your settings or world-this is becoming more complicated then it should be.

Sharpen your pencils, have a test “Clickety-clack” on your keyboard, and let’s “clickety-crack” down.

(I am SO not sorry).

*(Yes, I really am).

Settings can be complicated, especially for yours truly, often times I leave alot to be desired, and I think it’s something several writers can attest to having trouble with.

Especially when writing about a place you don’t know too much about, which is, when starting a story and setting the scene, I’ve got a few tips to get the inspiration grooven’ and the general information and fundamental’s moven’.

(Again I am both sorry, and not sorry).

1. Bust out the travel guides.

When creating a story, it’s often said that you write what you know-where you’ve been, what you’ve done, but if you’re anything like me, this concept can be a little awkward, as you try to write your stories furthest from reality. However, while writing what you know is a definite contender, I suggest you break out the travel guides, to get an idea of where you want your story to take place, and get some general information.

2. Map your place.

Now that you’ve chosen your place, whether it be city direct, or just a general providence/state, get a general idea of where your story is taking place. Are you creating a town in France? Where in France? Is it set permanently in France, or do they travel around? While these are things you might nowt have planned out just yet, it’s important to think about, and get a map set up of where you think the city, whether imaginary or real, is, and what opportunities surround it.

3. Dive into History

Now, I’m not a personal fan of History, I could never memorize dates, and to be honest, events don’t fascinate me as much as humans interactions.

*AHEM*

Psychology.

I digress, it’s still very important to have general information and history on this town, whether that’s something you have to create (I will release a blog post on this topic following boot camp), or a history existing. This will give you some description to play with, a possibly something to revert back to, should your story need it.

4. Research Cultures, Traditions, Religion, Population, and any other social aspects of things that occur in the country/area that your story is set in. It would be very strange to have a prominent Jewish community if it were actually Catholic or possibly Buddhist community. Make certain to note the struggles that your characters might have. Don’t forget to research the industry, and social status, as this information can also play into your character.

5. Research the Architecture, as well as the people’s responses to outsiders, and in general their responses to social situations.

I’m not sure how logical a Tudor home in predominately traditional Spanish style villas. It would also be strange to have the characters open to outsiders, if they were struggling after a war.

Of course, while this is just the general idea for setting the scene, a few more tips for this will be listed down below with your prompt of the day, and your tip.

***********

As always, I hope to see you back next week, pencil ready, thinking caps on, because we’re not even close to finished on your work of art.

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